curseboxes:

political correctness kills creativity' if you can't create something without furthering the oppression of minorities, you aren’t a very creative person.

(Source: blondejean)

As many as 15 percent of freshmen at America’s top schools are white students who failed to meet their university’s minimum standards for admission, according to Peter Schmidt, deputy editor of the Chronicle of Higher Education. These kids are “people with a long-standing relationship with the university,” or in other words, the children of faculty, wealthy alumni and politicians.

According to Schmidt, these unqualified but privileged kids are nearly twice as common on top campuses as Black and Latino students who had benefited from affirmative action.

dynastylnoire:

Painter painting in our land pictures of only white angels
Painter painting in our time in shadows of yesterday

Painter, if you paint with love, paint me some black angels now
For all good blacks in heaven, painter show us that you care

Eartha Kitt - Angelitos Negros (1970 performance)

The last gif

(Source: foxwin)

odelia-jay:

»» The MLK that’s never quoted.

and it’s no accident that this segment is conveniently left out of our education

(Source: beybad)

lunarobverse:

A brilliant metaphor

We need labels because we do not want to be overridden by the default. And that includes labels for the default, instead of allowing people to insist that they are the norm and thus don’t need a label. Hence all the brouhaha over ‘cis,’ a term used to describe people who have a gender consistent with that assigned to them at birth. It’s perfectly reasonable to label those people, distinguishing them from trans people, who have genders that differ from those assigned to them at birth. Both groups of people need to be identified.
A quarter of high schools with the highest percentage of black and Latino students do not offer Algebra II; a third of these schools do not offer chemistry. Fewer than half of American Indian and Native-Alaskan high school students have access to the full range of math and science courses in their high school
dynastylnoire:

hikergirl:

Here is the link to the City Lab article and the link to the actual website, Turn On Detroit’s Water.
h/t to amomenttothink for retweeting this.

boooooooooooooooooost

dynastylnoire:

hikergirl:

Here is the link to the City Lab article and the link to the actual website, Turn On Detroit’s Water.

h/t to amomenttothink for retweeting this.

boooooooooooooooooost

Instead of focusing exclusively on “racism,” our attention would shift to illicit white benefit. The ideal for racial justice would, quite simply, be the end to current racial exploitation, and the equitable redistribution of the benefits of past racial exploitation. Obviously working out the details would be hugely complicated, and in fine points impossible, but at least on the level of an ideal to be simply stated, and by which present-day society can be measured, it would give us something to shoot for.

In talking with the white majority, the imperative task has usually been to convince them that, independently of whether or not they are “racist” (however that term is to be understood), they are the beneficiaries of a system of racial domination and that this is the real issue, not whether they have goodwill toward people of color or whether they owned any slaves. The concept of racial exploitation is designed to bring out this central reality.
I think it’s weird that teenage girls know more about giving blowjobs than they do about masturbation. It makes me sick to my stomach that so many young girls think sex is just about a guy finishing.
I have no mercy or compassion in me for a society that will crush people, and then penalize them for not being able to stand under the weight.

bisexual-community:

The 16 most inspiring things about bisexual artist Frida KahloMexican painter Frida Kahlo was born 107 years ago today July 6, 1907. A feisty free spirit who blazed her own trail and inspired everyone around her.

Frida Kahlo is one of the most revered artists to come from 20th century Mexico. Her distinctive look and style are instantly recognizable and she has been called a diva, a muse and a feminist icon.

A force of nature perhaps best summed up by an art critic who saw one of her very first exhibitions and said: ‘It is impossible to separate the life and work of this extraordinary person. Her paintings are her biography.’

She fought through a great deal of adversity during her life. At the age of six she contracted polio, when she was 18 she was badly injured in a bus crash and later in life she suffered several miscarriages … Kahlo never lost her passion for life. She was well known as an extremely quick witted and sharp woman, always the centre of attention wherever she was. Her strength of character has made her an emblem of hope and determination for many.

Art historians usually focus on her relationship with fellow Mexican painter Diego Rivera (whom she married, divorced and then married again) and her affair with Communist leader Leon Trotsky. But Kahlo was bisexual, and made no secret of her affairs and relationships with women as well as men. Kahlo was linked with African American entertainer Josephine Baker, American painter Georgia O’Keeffe and Mexican singer Chavela Vargas.

Photographers were captivated by her beauty. She was a muse to photographer Nickolas Murray who loved to take her picture in her sumptuous Mexican clothes.

Her work has been exhibited in art galleries all over the world, her diary has been published and many authors have written biographies of her extraordinary life.The house she lived in is now a museum. La Casa Azul is filled with trinkets and treasure collected by Kahlo during her life and is one of the biggest cultural attractions in Mexico.

She defied classification of her work. Art critics tried to label her as a Surrealist painter, which was very trendy at the time, but she defied this label, instead saying: ‘They thought I was a Surrealist, but I wasn’t. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality.’

In 1938 André Breton, principal initiator of the surrealist movement, described Kahlo’s art as a "ribbon around a bomb".

sharkprivilege said: could you talk more about the male disney villains being queer coded with stereotypes?

blue-author:

commanderbishoujo:

gadaboutgreen:

biyuti:

fandomsandfeminism:

fandomsandfeminism:

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Pink hair bows. 

Many male Disney villains are what we would call “camp.” Effeminate, vain, “wimpy” and portrayed as laughable and unlikable. Calling upon common negative stereotypes about gay men, these villains are characterized as villainous by embodying these tropes and traits. 

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Think about it: Often Thin/un-muscled figure, heavily inked and shadowed eyes (giving the impression of eyeliner and eye shadow?), stereotypically “sassy” and/or manipulative, often ends up being cowardly once on the defensive, many have comedic male sidekicks (such as Wiggins, Smee, Iago, the…snake that isn’t Kaa) 

Other examples:

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since i was talking about one of the disney man villains who doesn’t fit this stereotype yesterday…

Gaston.

my bf was listening to that song about him yesterday

and i mentioned that he is literally the most terrifying disney villain

why?

because his type of evil is banal and commonplace

there are white men walking around who are exactly like him

men who think that women are prizes they deserve

men who will not listen or pay attention to a rejection

men who will go out of their way, if rejected, to ruin a woman’s life

ppl often seem to miss this when discussion beauty and the beast since the stockholm syndrom ‘romance’ is also a giant icky thing

the terrifying thing about gaston is that he is supposed to be (as all disney villains) a hyperbolic cartoon

but he is the absolutely truest and most real villain

because he exists in the real world

we all know men like him

Also, if we’re talking about queer coded characters the MOST important of all the characters is Ursula who was bad off of a drag Queen (Divine) and has a whole host of negative stereotypes.

She’s also my favorite.

This post is sorely missing some seriously important historical context. The term for this as film history goes is the sissy, and as a stock character the sissy is probably one of the oldest archetypes in Hollywood, going back to the silent film era. Some of the most enduring stereotypes of male queerness—the limp wrist, swishing, etc—can actually be traced to the exaggerated movements of cinematic sissies in silent films. And it’s important to note sissies were portrayed in a range of ways, though they were generally used to comedic effect; queerness was considered a joke, and the modern notion of the “sassy gay friend” in films can probably be traced back to this bullshit too. It wasn’t until the Hays Code was adopted in the ’30s that sissies almost uniformly started being portrayed as villains. Homosexuality was specifically targeted under the euphemism of “sexual perversion”, and the only way it could fly under the radar in films under the strict censorship of the code was by coding villains that way in contrast to the morally upright hetero heroes. Peter Lorre’s character in The Maltese Falcon is one off the top of my head, but there are a slew of them from the ’30s onward, and this trope didn’t go away after the Code ended either. More modern examples in live action films are Prince Edward in Braveheart, Buffalo Bill in Silence of the Lambs, and Xerxes in 300.

So Disney just provides some of the most egregious modern examples of the sissy villain, but this is a really old and really gross trope that goes back years and years in Western film. There’s a fantastic book and accompanying documentary about the history of homosexuality in film by Vito Russo called The Celluloid Closet that gets into a lot of this.

It’s incredibly refreshing to see a response to a post like this that starts with “This post is sorely missing some seriously important historical context.” and then goes on to provide important historical context that adds information to the point being made. I was seriously wincing and bracing myself for “You guys, you don’t understand. It was different back then.”

(Of course, I wouldn’t have been worried if the name of the last poster hadn’t scrolled off the top of my screen by the time I got to it.)

oppression is not a feeling. reducing it how to a community ‘feels’ they are being treated minimizes the violences that are enacted upon them, makes structural injustices a matter of perception of individual acceptance or rejection of oppressive conditions. oppression creates feelings, definitely. it creates trauma, internalized conflict, dissonance, confusion. but oppression is not a feeling.

crazybabyy94:

2damnfeisty:

rozhanitsa:

2damnfeisty:

Nobody gives the black girl mob credit for being smart as fuck. They clown but at the end of the day they are really intelligent.

And it’s not subtle at all.
Taystee is a math prodigy in addition to being well-read, Poussey is multilingual, Cindy just knows shit, Suzanne studies Shakespeare, Watson was a good student in addition to being a track star, Vee is basically an evil genius. Piper often learns the most from them; they taught her how to fight and helped translate Pennsatucky’s biblical threat.
The show flat out acknowledges the (academic) intelligence of the black inmates time and time again, but the audience collectively ignores it.

ALL OF THIS

!!!!!!!!!!!!! THEY REALLY ARE THE SMARTEST! AND NO ONE NOT EVEN ME NOTICED THAT

(Source: ageofdesiderata)